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Thomas Hatfield

Home  Search  Individual  Pedigree  Descendancy  Relationship  Timeline  Login
Birth  Abt 1600  Almondbury, Yorkshire England 
Sex  Male 
Died  Abt 1698  Amsterdam, Holland 
Person ID  I956  Default Tree 
Last Modified  14 Dec 2005 
 
Father  Johis Hatfield, b. Abt 1589, Almondbury, Yorkshire, England 
Group Sheet  F6317  Default Tree 
 
Father  Johis Hatfield, b. Abt 1589, Almondbury, Yorkshire, England 
Mother  Elizabeth Bristow, b. Abt 1580 
Group Sheet  F5374  Default Tree 
 
Family 1  Anna Hentem COX, Cox, b. 14 Mar 1612, Englefield, Berkshire, England 
Married  21 May 1621  Leyden, Holland or England 
Notes  _FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural

DATE 20 December 2004
TIME 22:51

_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural

_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural

DATE 20 December 2004
TIME 22:51

_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural

_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
_FREL Natural
_MREL Natural
Children 
 1. Joseph Hatfield, b. Abt 1623
 2. MattiasMattMatthew Hatfield, b. 25 Aug 1640, Leyden, Holland
 3. Matthias Hatfield, b. 25 Aug 1640, Danzig Gdansk Province, Poland
 4. William Hatfield, b. Aft 1621
 5. Thomas Jr Hatfield, b. 1627, Leyden, Holland
Group Sheet  F6282  Default Tree 
 
Family 2  Alice Ebel TROTTER, b. 16 Oct 1650 
Notes  DATE 20 December 2004
TIME 22:51

DATE 20 December 2004
TIME 22:51
Group Sheet  F6453  Default Tree 
 
Notes  Fled to Leyden, Holland, about 1610, with Dr. John Robinson's Congregation, to avoid religious persecution by the crown for being a dissenter. The Hatfields are an ancient English family, their
roots in the early sixteenth century. A few of them were of the landed gentry but most sturdy yeomen. The first identifiable ancestor of the American branch Thomas Hatfield, born about 1600, of
Yorkshire. He was a religious dissenter and to escape persecution fled to Leyden, Holland, with the John Robinson congregation. He married Anna Hentem ( Hampton) Cox, of Valentine (Oocxs) Cox, on
May 1, 1621. Mattias (Matt, Matthew) Hatfield, said to be the son of Thomas and born in Holland, appears in Elizabeth, New Elizabeth, New Jersey, in about 1660. He married Maria (Mary) Moylen
(Melen), a lady of Dutch descent, in August 1625.

GIVN Thomas
SURN HATFIELD
NSFX I
From: deborah hargrove He was a religious dissenter and to escape persecution, fled to Leydon, Holland, with the Dr. John Robinson (Robertson) congregation.
ABBR Linda Bentley
TITL Linda Bentley
AUTH Linda Bentley dinkumthinkum@hotmail.com
ABBR Linda Bentley
TITL Linda Bentley
AUTH Linda Bentley dinkumthinkum@hotmail.com
ABBR Elizabeth Gambrell
TITL Elizabeth Gambrell
ABBR Angela Michele Adkins
TITL Angela Michele Adkins
AUTH Angela Michele Adkins angia@bellsouth.net
ABBR Elizabeth Gambrell
TITL Elizabeth Gambrell
ABBR Angela Michele Adkins
TITL Angela Michele Adkins
AUTH Angela Michele Adkins angia@bellsouth.net
EMIG
Thomas Hatfield went from Yorkshire, England to Leyden, Holland about 1610 and was of the congregation of John Robinson's Church at the time of his marriage. He and his sons appear to have come to
America about 1660. Thomas Hatfield I and Matthias Hatfield were weavers at New Haven and Elizabeth.
RELI
PLAC Member Of John Robinson's Church
EVEN Alt. Birth
TYPE Alt. Birth
DATE 1596
PLAC Prussia
RELI John Robinson
DATE 1575-1625
ROBINSON, JOHN (1575-1625), English Nonconformist divine, was born probably in Lincolnshire or Nottinghamshire about 1575. He seems to have studied at Cambridge, and to have been influenced by
William Perkins. He took orders and held a curacy in Norwich, but was attracted by Puritan doctrines, and finally associated himself with a Congregation meeting at Gainsborough (where the " John
Robinson Memorial Church " bears witness to his work). In 1606 the members divided into two societies, Robinson becoming minister of the one which made its headquarters at Scrooby, a neighboring
village. The increasing hostility of the authorities towards nonconformity soon forced him and his people to think of flight, and, not without difficulty, they succeeded in making their escape in
detachments to Holland. Robinson settled in Amsterdam in 1608, but in the following year removed, with a large contingent, to Leiden, where he ministered to a community whose numbers gradually grew
from one hundred to three hundred. In 1620 a considerable minority of these sailed for England in the " Speedwell," and ultimately crossed the Atlantic in the " Mayflower "; it was Robinson's
intention to follow as soon as practicable, along with the rest of his flock, but he died before the plan could be carried out, on the ist of March 1625. In the early stages of the Arminian
controversy he took the Calvinistic side, and even engaged in a public disputation with the famous Episcopius. He bore a high reputation even among his ecclesiastical opponents, and one of them
(Robert Baillie) calls him " the most learned, polished and modest spirit that ever that sect enjoyed." He was large-minded and eminently reasonable in spirit, recognizing parish assemblies where "
the pure word and discipline" prevailed as true churches of God. His sound judgment is seen in the way in which he adjusted the relations of elders and church the most delicate practical problem of
Congregationalism. Amongst his publications may be mentioned Justification of Separation from the Church (1610), Apologia Brownistarum (1619), A Defence of the Doctrine propounded by the Synod of
Dort (1624), and a volume of Essays, or Observations Divine and Moral, printed in 1625. His Works (with one exception, A Manumission to a Manduction, since published by the Massachusetts Historical
Society, ser. iv., vol. i.), including a memoir, were reprinted by R. Ashtoti in three vols. in 1851. A summary of their contents is given in G. Punchard, History of Congregationalism (New York,
1867), iii. 300-344. See further CONGREGATIONALISM, and the literature there cited; also O. S. Davis, John Robinson (Hartford, Connecticut, 1897).
DATE 20 December 2004
TIME 22:51

Fled to Leyden, Holland, about 1610, with Dr. John Robinson's Congregation, to avoid religious persecution by the crown for being a dissenter. The Hatfields are an ancient English family, their
roots in the early sixteenth century. A few of them were of the landed gentry but most sturdy yeomen. The first identifiable ancestor of the American branch Thomas Hatfield, born about 1600, of
Yorkshire. He was a religious dissenter and to escape persecution fled to Leyden, Holland, with the John Robinson congregation. He married Anna Hentem ( Hampton) Cox, of Valentine (Oocxs) Cox, on
May 1, 1621. Mattias (Matt, Matthew) Hatfield, said to be the son of Thomas and born in Holland, appears in Elizabeth, New Elizabeth, New Jersey, in about 1660. He married Maria (Mary) Moylen
(Melen), a lady of Dutch descent, in August 1625.

Fled to Leyden, Holland, about 1610, with Dr. John Robinson's Congregation, to avoid religious persecution by the crown for being a dissenter. The Hatfields are an ancient English family, their
roots in the early sixteenth century. A few of them were of the landed gentry but most sturdy yeomen. The first identifiable ancestor of the American branch Thomas Hatfield, born about 1600, of
Yorkshire. He was a religious dissenter and to escape persecution fled to Leyden, Holland, with the John Robinson congregation. He married Anna Hentem ( Hampton) Cox, of Valentine (Oocxs) Cox, on
May 1, 1621. Mattias (Matt, Matthew) Hatfield, said to be the son of Thomas and born in Holland, appears in Elizabeth, New Elizabeth, New Jersey, in about 1660. He married Maria (Mary) Moylen
(Melen), a lady of Dutch descent, in August 1625.

GIVN Thomas
SURN HATFIELD
NSFX I
From: deborah hargrove He was a religious dissenter and to escape persecution, fled to Leydon, Holland, with the Dr. John Robinson (Robertson) congregation.
ABBR Linda Bentley
TITL Linda Bentley
AUTH Linda Bentley dinkumthinkum@hotmail.com
ABBR Linda Bentley
TITL Linda Bentley
AUTH Linda Bentley dinkumthinkum@hotmail.com
ABBR Elizabeth Gambrell
TITL Elizabeth Gambrell
ABBR Angela Michele Adkins
TITL Angela Michele Adkins
AUTH Angela Michele Adkins angia@bellsouth.net
ABBR Elizabeth Gambrell
TITL Elizabeth Gambrell
ABBR Angela Michele Adkins
TITL Angela Michele Adkins
AUTH Angela Michele Adkins angia@bellsouth.net
EMIG
Thomas Hatfield went from Yorkshire, England to Leyden, Holland about 1610 and was of the congregation of John Robinson's Church at the time of his marriage. He and his sons appear to have come to
America about 1660. Thomas Hatfield I and Matthias Hatfield were weavers at New Haven and Elizabeth.
RELI
PLAC Member Of John Robinson's Church
EVEN Alt. Birth
TYPE Alt. Birth
DATE 1596
PLAC Prussia
RELI John Robinson
DATE 1575-1625
ROBINSON, JOHN (1575-1625), English Nonconformist divine, was born probably in Lincolnshire or Nottinghamshire about 1575. He seems to have studied at Cambridge, and to have been influenced by
William Perkins. He took orders and held a curacy in Norwich, but was attracted by Puritan doctrines, and finally associated himself with a Congregation meeting at Gainsborough (where the " John
Robinson Memorial Church " bears witness to his work). In 1606 the members divided into two societies, Robinson becoming minister of the one which made its headquarters at Scrooby, a neighboring
village. The increasing hostility of the authorities towards nonconformity soon forced him and his people to think of flight, and, not without difficulty, they succeeded in making their escape in
detachments to Holland. Robinson settled in Amsterdam in 1608, but in the following year removed, with a large contingent, to Leiden, where he ministered to a community whose numbers gradually grew
from one hundred to three hundred. In 1620 a considerable minority of these sailed for England in the " Speedwell," and ultimately crossed the Atlantic in the " Mayflower "; it was Robinson's
intention to follow as soon as practicable, along with the rest of his flock, but he died before the plan could be carried out, on the ist of March 1625. In the early stages of the Arminian
controversy he took the Calvinistic side, and even engaged in a public disputation with the famous Episcopius. He bore a high reputation even among his ecclesiastical opponents, and one of them
(Robert Baillie) calls him " the most learned, polished and modest spirit that ever that sect enjoyed." He was large-minded and eminently reasonable in spirit, recognizing parish assemblies where "
the pure word and discipline" prevailed as true churches of God. His sound judgment is seen in the way in which he adjusted the relations of elders and church the most delicate practical problem of
Congregationalism. Amongst his publications may be mentioned Justification of Separation from the Church (1610), Apologia Brownistarum (1619), A Defence of the Doctrine propounded by the Synod of
Dort (1624), and a volume of Essays, or Observations Divine and Moral, printed in 1625. His Works (with one exception, A Manumission to a Manduction, since published by the Massachusetts Historical
Society, ser. iv., vol. i.), including a memoir, were reprinted by R. Ashtoti in three vols. in 1851. A summary of their contents is given in G. Punchard, History of Congregationalism (New York,
1867), iii. 300-344. See further CONGREGATIONALISM, and the literature there cited; also O. S. Davis, John Robinson (Hartford, Connecticut, 1897).
DATE 20 December 2004
TIME 22:51

Fled to Leyden, Holland, about 1610, with Dr. John Robinson's Congregation, to avoid religious persecution by the crown for being a dissenter. The Hatfields are an ancient English family, their
roots in the early sixteenth century. A few of them were of the landed gentry but most sturdy yeomen. The first identifiable ancestor of the American branch Thomas Hatfield, born about 1600, of
Yorkshire. He was a religious dissenter and to escape persecution fled to Leyden, Holland, with the John Robinson congregation. He married Anna Hentem ( Hampton) Cox, of Valentine (Oocxs) Cox, on
May 1, 1621. Mattias (Matt, Matthew) Hatfield, said to be the son of Thomas and born in Holland, appears in Elizabeth, New Elizabeth, New Jersey, in about 1660. He married Maria (Mary) Moylen
(Melen), a lady of Dutch descent, in August 1625.

Fled to Leyden, Holland, about 1610, with Dr. John Robinson's Congregation, to avoid religious persecution by the crown for being a dissenter. The Hatfields are an ancient English family, their
roots in the early sixteenth century. A few of them were of the landed gentry but most sturdy yeomen. The first identifiable ancestor of the American branch Thomas Hatfield, born about 1600, of
Yorkshire. He was a religious dissenter and to escape persecution fled to Leyden, Holland, with the John Robinson congregation. He married Anna Hentem ( Hampton) Cox, of Valentine (Oocxs) Cox, on
May 1, 1621. Mattias (Matt, Matthew) Hatfield, said to be the son of Thomas and born in Holland, appears in Elizabeth, New Elizabeth, New Jersey, in about 1660. He married Maria (Mary) Moylen
(Melen), a lady of Dutch descent, in August 1625.
 
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